Thanksgiving table, first time ever hosting this holiday in our home. #abundance #gratitude #tablesetting

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Spending my Saturday night like….. #acupunctureschoolgotmelike #gradschool #facialmuscles #anatomyandphysiology

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Chim chiminey Chim cha roo! #marypoppins #magicintheair #halloween #myfavorite #supracalafragelisticexpealadocious

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The cutest ever study buddy. #acupunctureschoolgotmelike #studygram #cats #catsofinstagram

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On a bus rolling through the Sierras. #freshair #roadtrip #feelingood

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Making medicinal oils just like Tony taught me too. #acupunctureschoolgotmelike #plantmedicine #herbalism #gratitude #comfrey #calendula

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First ever sourdough loaf, inspired by @elisa.dubose and instructed by @breadtopia website. Feeling good.

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Sun infused plant water today. #chamomile #lemonverbena #spearmint #jasmineflower #sunlight #magic

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Chamomile and jasmine flower water today for hydration and healing. #flowermedicine #lovely #gratitude

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Mentha x piperita (Peppermint)

LATIN NAME:  Mentha piperita

 

Common Name: Peppermint

 

Energy and Flavor: Cooling, aromatic and spicy.

 

Time of Year: Blooms in late Summer

 

Family:  Lamiaceae

 

Habitat: Stream banks and in damp, wasted soil.

 

Botany: Perennial with creeping rootstock, dark green opposite leaves, purple stems, and small purple pink or white flowers.

 

Parts Used:  Aerial parts

 

Collecting: Harvest on a dry, sunny day in late morning after the dew has dried just before blooming in late summer.

 

Preparation:

  • Tincture (1:5, 40% alcohol)
  • Hot infusion
  • Capsules
  • Essential oil

 

Constituents: Phenolic acids (caffeic, chlorogenic, and rosmarinic), essential oil (major components of which are menthol, menthone, and menthyl acetate), flavanoids, tannins.

 

Actions:

  • Carminative
  • Antiinflammatory
  • Antispasmodic
  • Aromatic
  • Diaphoretic
  • Antiemetic
  • Nervine
  • Antimicrobial
  • Analgesic

 

Medicinal Use:

  • Relaxes muscles of the digestive system.
  • Combats flatulence.
  • Stimulates the flow of bile and digestive juices.
  • Volatile oil acts as a mild anesthetic to the stomach wall easing nausea.
  • Indicated for constricted and depressed tissue states.
  • Scanty secretion of urine and frequent desire to void.
  • Mastitis
  • Muscle tension and spasms
  • Indicated for colds and flu with wind-heat and green/yellow mucous
  • Hot, dry joints.

 

Contraindications:

None noted, don’t take for extended periods of time, discontinue after 3-4 weeks.

 

References:

 

Grieves, Maude. Botanical.com (http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/e/elecam07.html#cul)

 

Hobbs, Christopher. Herbal Prescriber. (http://www.christopherhobbs.com/herbal-prescriber/)

 

Hoffman, David. The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press,2003),

 

Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs. (New York, NY: Pocket Books, 1998)

 

Wood, Matthew. The Earthwise Herbal: Complete Guide to Old World Medicinal Plants. (Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Press, 2008)

 

Mahonia aquifolium, Berberis aquifolium (Oregon Grape)

LATIN NAME:  Mahonia aquifolium, Berberis aquifolium

 

Common Name: Oregon Grape

 

Energy and Flavor: Cold to warm, sweet, bitter.

 

Time of Year: Blooms in Spring

 

Family: Berberidaceae

 

Habitat: Shady lower forests and coastal ranges of the Pacific Northwest.

 

Botany: A perennial, evergreen native plant of the barberry family with stiff prickly leaves, clusters of yellow flowers, and sour bright blue berries

 

Parts Used: Root, Leaf, Flower (flower essence only)

 

Collecting: Gather roots and lower yellow stems from midsummer to winter.

 

Preparation:

  • Fresh root tincture (1:2)
  • Dry root tincture (1:5, 50% alcohol)
  • Powdered and dried leaf (for external use)
  • Oil infusion with Vitamin E.
  • Hot infusion of leaves (use as mouthwash)
  • Flower essence

 

Constituents: Alkaloids of the isoquinoline type (berberine, berbamine, hydrastine, oxycanthine).

 

Actions:

  • Alterative
  • Cholagogue
  • Laxative
  • Antiemetic
  • Anticatarrhal
  • Digestive tonic
  • Bitter
  • Antimicrobial (especially for the urinary system)

 

Medicinal Use:

  • Powerful bitter that increases gastrointestinal secretions improving digestion, assimilation and metabolism.
  • Purifies the blood
  • Indicated for tissue states of atrophy and stagnation.
  • Chronic catarrhal conditions of the respiratory system, especially with thick, sticky mucous.
  • Flower essence is indicated for paranoia.
  • Constipation.
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Lymphatic congestion
  • Mononucleosis
  • Muscular, bone and periosteal pains especially at night.
  • Disglycemia
  • Diabetes

 

Contraindications:

  • Pregnancy

 

References:

 

Grieves, Maude. Botanical.com (http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/e/elecam07.html#cul)

 

Hobbs, Christopher. Herbal Prescriber. (http://www.christopherhobbs.com/herbal-prescriber/)

 

Hoffman, David. The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press,2003),

 

Moore, Michael. Medicinal Plants of the Pacific Northwest. (Santa Fe, New Mexico: Museum of New Mexico Press, 1993)

 

Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs. (New York, NY: Pocket Books, 1998)

 

Wood, Matthew. The Earthwise Herbal: Complete Guide to New World Medicinal Plants. (Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Press, 2009)

 

Silybum marianum, Carduus marianus (Milk thistle)

LATIN NAME:  Silybum marianum, Carduus marianus

 

Common Name: Milk thistle

 

Energy and Flavor: Cooling, bitter and sweet

 

Time of Year: Blooms June to August

 

Family: Asteraceae

 

Habitat: Disturbed ground and embankments, near buildings.

 

Botany:  A tall stout, spiny thistle with bright purple flowering heads. The glossy, toothed leaves are covered with wavy milky bands.

 

Parts Used: Seeds and aerial parts

 

Collecting: Collect aerial parts when first blooming and leaves are tender. Collect seed pods once turned brown on plant.

 

Preparation:

  • Leaves and stems in salad
  • Boil flower heads
  • Tincture (seeds)
  • Fluid extract (seeds)

 

Constituents:  Flavolignans. Mixture known as silymarin composed mainly of silybin, silydanin, and silychristin, oleic acid, palmitic acid, cholesterol, campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol and mucilage.

 

Actions:

  • Hepatic
  • Galactagogue
  • Demulcent
  • Cholagogue
  • Antihepatotoxic

 

Medicinal Use:

  • Specific antidote for poisoning by Amanita mushroom.
  • Indicated for atrophied tissue states.
  • Safe for use by breast feeding mothers to promote milk secretion.
  • Edema associated with liver and kidney problems.
  • Constipation
  • Rebuilding liver tissue after damage due to alcohol, acetaminophen, psychotropic medications and viral hepatitis.
  • Indicated for dull heavy head with despondency and coated tongue, with lack of appetite and nausea.  
  • Asthma
  • Gallbladder pain
  • Supportive and protective of the liver during chemotherapy.

 

Contraindications: Contraindicated for people with liver cancer, and potentially other cancers because of its cell proliferative properties.

 

References:

 

Grieves, Maude. Botanical.com (http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/e/elecam07.html#cul)

 

Hobbs, Christopher. Herbal Prescriber. (http://www.christopherhobbs.com/herbal-prescriber/)

 

Hoffman, David. The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press,2003),

 

Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs. (New York, NY: Pocket Books, 1998)
Wood, Matthew. The Earthwise Herbal: Complete Guide to Old World Medicinal Plants. (Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Press, 2008)

Matricaria chamomilla (Chamomile)

 

LATIN NAME:  Matricaria chamomilla

 

Common Name: German chamomile

 

Energy and Flavor: Neutral to warming, bitter, spicy and aromatic

 

Time of Year: May thru August

 

Family: Compositae

 

Botany: A feathery-leaved pineapple-scented with small daisy-like yellow and white flowers

 

Parts Used: Flower

 

Habitat: Open ground with sandy soil in full sun.

 

Collecting: Select flowers that are nearly open. Collect in the morning after dew has evaporated.

 

Preparation:

  • Hot infusion
  • Cold infusion
  • Tincture (fresh-to preserve volatile oils, dried for carminative properties)
  • Essential oil (diluted with carrier oil for external application)
  • Lotion
  • Salve
  • Hair rinse
  • Eyewash

 

Constituents: Azulene (considered to be medicinally active constituent), lavonoids, bitter sesquiterpene lactones, volatile oils, mucilage, amino acids, fatty acids, coumarins.

 

Actions:

  • Mild sedative
  • Carminative
  • Nervine
  • Antispasmodic
  • Anodyne
  • Diaphoretic
  • Emmenogogue

 

Medicinal Use:

  • Consider first for all digestive complaints
  • Specifically indicated for irritated, constricted and stagnant tissue states
  • Excellent for soothing teething children.
  • Relieves menstrual pain and cramping.
  • Lack of appetite
  • Eczema, psoriasis, urticaria, burning, burns, blisters, radiation burns and acne.
  • Congestion of the liver with green stool
  • Bronchitis, spasmodic cough, catarrh, asthma
  • Tongue tends to be irritated along the sides, coated with white-yellow in the middle.
  • Canker sores
  • Eye irritation, conjunctivitis.
  • Dandruff
  • Small, tense and rapid pulse.
  • Nightmares and night terrors.

 

Contraindications:

  • Contraindicated for those allergic to plants in the Aster family.

 

Personal observations:

  • Cold infusion is supremely hydrating.

 

References:

 

De Bairacli Levy, Juliette. The Illustrated Herbal Handbook for Everyone. (London, UK: Faber and Faber, 1991)

 

Grieves, Maude. Botanical.com (http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/e/elecam07.html#cul)

 

Hobbs, Christopher. Herbal Prescriber. (http://www.christopherhobbs.com/herbal-prescriber/)

 

Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs. (New York, NY: Pocket Books, 1998)

Wood, Matthew. The Earthwise Herbal: Complete Guide to Old World Medicinal Plants. (Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Press, 2008)

More #bakingtherapy today with mango walnut #spelt muffins sweetened with honey. #ilovebeinginthekitchen #homebaker

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Fresh herb infused water today for hydration and healing. #plantmedicine #plantallies #herbalism

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Baking therapy this morning. Spelt apple cinnamon muffins with oat streusel topping. #baking #bakingtherapy #muffinsaredelicious

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Artemisia vulgaris (Mugwort)

LATIN NAME:  Artemisia vulgaris

Common Name: Mugwort

Energy and Flavor: Slightly warm, bitter, acrid

Time of Year: Blooms from July to September

Family: Asteraceae

Habitat: Rocky soils around streams and embankments.

Botany: An aromatic herb with green to grayish toothed leaves and sprays of greenish flowers.

Parts Used: Leaves, root.

Collecting: Collect leaves at full moon just before the plant goes to seed. Dig the root in Winter.

Preparation:

  • Tincture ( 1:5, 25%)
  • Hot infusion

Constituents: Volatile oils (including linalool), sesquiterpene lactones, flavonoids, coumarin derivatives, triterpenes.

Actions:

  • Emmenagogue
  • Bitter tonic
  • Stimulant
  • Nervine tonic
  • Mild narcotic
  • Cholagogue
  • Vermifuge
  • Hemostatic (when applied externally?)
  • Diaphoretic
  • Antispasmodic
  • Carminative

Medicinal Use:

  • For persons (especially women) with a pulse that is weak on the right arm and stronger on the left arm.
  • Use whenever digestive stimulation is indicated.
  • Indicated for easing depression and tension.
  • Promote normal menstrual flow
  • Relieves violent menstrual pain at the beginning of menstruation
  • Cold hands and feet (oil of the herb applied externally)
  • Hardness in the pulse
  • Persons who are sensitive to light, exhausted, restless, trouble maintaining deep sleep.
  • Especially indicated for highly intelligent, gifting artistic people with heightened acuity of any or all of the five senses, but lacking common comprehension and skills.
  • Dyslexia
  • Poor appetite and lack of bile and digestive secretion,
  • Indicated for constipation.
  • Weak, sensitive women..
  • Women who have suffered abuse, abortion, obstetric injuries with stiff cold lower back and joints.
  • Nervousness during PMS
  • Profuse and offensive sweating

Contraindications:

  • Potential allergen to those sensitive to plants in the Asteraceae family.
  • Do not take while pregnant
  • Best to not take tincture for more than a 10 day period 3 times a year.
  • Tea is safe for drinking all year long.

Personal observations: Mugwort is one of my closest plant allies. It gives me protection and courage, reduces anxiety and nervousness and enhances my well being.

References:

Grieves, Maude. Botanical.com (http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/e/elecam07.html#cul)

 

Hobbs, Christopher. Herbal Prescriber. (http://www.christopherhobbs.com/herbal-prescriber/)

 

Hoffman, David. The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press,2003),

 

Moore, Michael. Medicinal Plants of the Pacific Northwest. (Santa Fe, New Mexico: Museum of New Mexico Press, 1993)

 

Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs. (New York, NY: Pocket Books, 1998)

 

Wood, Matthew. The Earthwise Herbal: Complete Guide to Old World Medicinal Plants. (Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Press, 2008)

Herb Walk- Mt. Talmalpais

 

Lupinus sp. (Lupin) lupinus
Eschscholzia californica (California Poppy( california poppy

Herb Walk – Huckleberry Botanic Preserve

view from huckleberry

 

Plantago lanceolata (Plantain)  plantain
Urtica dioica (Stinging nettle)  20170305_102143
Heracleum sp. (Cow parsnip)  20170305_100850
Gallium aparine (Cleavers)  20170305_103109
Scrophularia sp. (Figwort)  20170305_101200
Umbellularia californica (California Bay Laurel)  20170305_103703
Quercus agrifolia leaf (Oak leaf)  
Quercus agrifolia (California Oak tree)  20170305_101839
Melissa officinalis (Lemon Balm)  melissa officinalis
Artemisia vulgaris (Mugwort)

 

 mugwort
Rumex sp. (Dock)  rumex sp.
Vaccinium sp. (Huckleberry)  huckleberry
Ganoderma sp. (Artist’s Conch)  ganoderma sp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ulmus rubra (Slippery Elm) Monograph

LATIN NAME:  Ulmus rubra

Common Name: Slippery elm

Energy and Flavor: Sweet and neutral

Time of Year: First of the season to flower, early Spring.

Family: Ulmaceae

Habitat: Grows in zones 3-9, particular to ravines and valleys where there is a lot of water. Especially abundant in the Eastern Woodlands of North America.

Botany: Flowers are umbels. Leaves are unequally toothed and have tiny hairs on both front and back. Bark is rough. Test to confirm by applying pressure to the twigs, the bark will give a little under pressure indicating mucilage.

Parts Used: Inner bark

Collecting: Collected in Spring from the bole and larger branches. Environmental concerns with collecting because of the presence of Dutch Elm disease.

Preparation:

  • Fine powder for internal use: Stir in a small amount of cold water, make a paste, then add boiling water and stir well. In this application a heaping teaspoon will make 1 pint of medicine. Also an option to stir in with mashed banana or yogurt as it combine more readily with fats and oils.
  • Coarse powder for external use as a poultice. Use the coarse powder combined with hot water to make a paste and then directly apply to ulcers, bedsores and wounds. Cover with bandage and and dressing should be changed at least once daily.

Constituents: Mucilage composed of proteins, mucins, amino acids, iodine, bromine and manganese salts.

Actions:

  • Demulcent
  • Yin tonic
  • Expectorant
  • Emollient
  • Nutritive
  • Astringent (mild)
  • Antiinflammatory
  • Vulnerary

Medicinal Use:

  • Well suited for treating sensitive/inflamed mucous membranes of the digestive system, mouth and throat.
  • Indicated for use in gastritis, gastric or duodenal ulcer, enteritis, colitis and diarrhea.
  • Excellent food to be eaten during convalescence because it is mild and easily assimilated by the body.
  • Indicated for use externally as a poultice for boils, abscesses, ulcers, burns, scalds and carbuncles. .
  • Indicated for vaginitis, hemorrhoids and anal fissures.
  • Indicated for the atrophied tissue state.

Contraindications:

  • Excessive dosing can cause it to absorb too much of intestinal secretions, causing a dried out condition.
  • Long term use is also contraindicated.
  • May slow the absorption of orally administered drugs.

Personal observations: Excellent for treatment of acute incidents of GI inflammation.

References:

Grieves, Maude. Botanical.com (http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/e/elecam07.html#cul)

Hobbs, Christopher. Herbal Prescriber. (http://www.christopherhobbs.com/herbal-prescriber/)

Hoffman, David. The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press,2003),

Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs. (New York, NY: Pocket Books, 1998)

Wood, Matthew. The Earthwise Herbal: Complete Guide to New World Medicinal Plants. (Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Press, 2009)

 

Zingiber officinalis (Ginger) Monograph

LATIN NAME:  Zingiber officinale

Common Name: Ginger

Energy and Flavor: warming to hot, pungent, spicy, slightly sweet.

Time of Year: Needs at least one to 3 years of undisturbed growth to bloom. Must have at least 10 months of weather at 70 degrees or above to thrive.

Family: Zingiberaceae

Habitat: Humid, warm climate.

Botany: A tropical plant with pink, tan to yellow flowers. Grows at least 3 feet tall from underground rhizomes that are perennial. Elongated medium green bamboo-like leaves.

Parts Used: Rhizome

Collecting: Harvest mature ginger after leaves  have died back in Fall and Winter.

Preparation:

  • Hot infusion
  • Candied rhizome
  • Tincture (1:5, 40 %), fresh plant tincture.
  • Poultice
  • Fomentation
  • Oil infusion
  • Salve

Constituents: Volatile oil containing primarily the sesquiterpene zingiberene, bisabolene, oleoresin, gingerols, gingerdiols, gingerdiones, dihydrogingerdiones, shogaols, lipids.

Actions:

  • Stimulant
  • Carminative
  • Antispasmodic
  • Rubefacient
  • Diaphoretic
  • Emmenagogue

Medicinal Use:

  • Indicated for tissue states of depression, constriction and atrophy.
  • Excellent preventative and treatment for motion sickness.
  • Effectively stimulates peripheral circulation making it effective for bad circulation, chilblains and cramps.
  • External use for muscles sprains and fibrositis (as a base treatment).
  • Appetite stimulant
  • Indicated for rheumatoid arthritis due to its antiinflammatory actions.
  • Specifically indicated for headache, migraine, and vertigo.
  • Sore throat and swollen glands in the throat.
  • Apply a warm poultice for stuck mucus in the chest, pneumonia, and bronchitis.
  • Dry, ticklish cough (hot infusion).
  • Intestinal fermentation or putrefaction
  • Blood thinner to wean off coumadin (2 capsules daily of ginger plus 1 tbsp flaxseed oil (work with MD)
  • Warms up a cold uterus, relieves cramps associated with stagnant  and cold blood (warm poultice of fresh rhizome).
  • Increases and decreases appetite
  • Sore and cramped muscles (ginger oil or salve)
  • Drop in energy around 3pm
  • Immune deficiency, persons with exhaustion and low energy
  • Inflammation and pus in the eyes (infuse pulverized ginger in wine over night, apply externally)

Contraindications:

  • Can be too warming for some people and some conditions.
  • Dried ginger used in a bath can cause severe irritation of sensitive tissues.

Personal observations: Warming and spicy, excellent for relieving cold and stagnation in the body, especially in the GI tract, female reproductive system and respiratory system.

References:

Grieves, Maude. Botanical.com (http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/e/elecam07.html#cul)

Hobbs, Christopher. Herbal Prescriber. (http://www.christopherhobbs.com/herbal-prescriber/)

Hoffman, David. The Science and Practice of Herbal Medicine. (Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press,2003),

Tierra, Michael. The Way of Herbs. (New York, NY: Pocket Books, 1998)

Wood, Matthew. The Earthwise Herbal: Complete Guide to Old World Medicinal Plants. (Berkeley, CA: North Atlantic Press, 2008)

 

 

Making homemade #reishi mushroom decoction tonight. The mushroom is organic, sustainably sourced and affordable from #rainbowgrocery in SF. #adaptogens #medicinalmushrooms #plantmedicine #plantmagic

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Happy 31st birthday to this amazing guy. #partner #sweetheart #mylove❤️ #happybirthday

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Plant medicine production happening this evening with calendula and comfrey oil that has been infusing for a month. #healingsalve #plantmedicine #herbalism

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Started out two infused oils with the folk method I learned in class. Finally starting to have a solid understanding of ratios. Yay! #medicinemaking #plantmedicine #calendula #comfrey

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Finished assembling the winter warmer vodka on this rainy day. In addition to Buddha’s Hand, I added cinnamon sticks, cardamom, fresh orange peel, whole cloves and coriander. #wintercocktails #kitchencreations #magicandspice #prairieorganicvodka

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So thankful for the Holy Basil in my little container garden. Harvested this morning to dry the leaves for my daily tea. #plantmedicine #tulsi #adaptogens #mymedicine

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Loving this gorgeous Buddha’s Hand from my farm box this week. Going to infuse it into organic vokda for winter warming cocktails. #farmfreshtoyou #sobeautiful #citron #cocktailmagic

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Home brewed kombucha is rockin’ along and ready to enjoy. #fermentation #kombuchalove

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Wowsers! Some seriously huge cauliflower (satsuma for scale). #ffty #farmfreshtoyou #iloveveggies #farmbox #capayorganic #gratitude

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A sweet, nourishing blend this morning for body and mind. Fresh muddled Spearmint and Holy Basil with dried Nettle leaf. #plantmedicine #hotinfusion #herbalism #fallnourishment #tea

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Version one of #flowerpower sore muscle salve complete. Test results soon! #plantmedicine #flowermedicine #myherbalstudies #thisissocool

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Organic olive oil infused with organic Arnica and Calendula flowers. Made them in separate batches so I can experiment with ratios in a new salve for supporting tired and sore muscles. #plantmedicine #flowermedicine #myherbalstudies

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In the Clear Blue

Today I sat among the clouds

In the clear blue of the sky

Today I travel through time and space

Suspended in air

A comfy capsule my ride

Up and up we fly

Among the currents of wind

Into the clear blue space above the Earth I know so well

First batch of refrigerator pickled organic beets made with produce from @imperfectfruit . I think they are going to be delicious. #uglyproduceisbeautiful #imperfect #homemadepickles

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Feel Better Tea Blend

Feel Better Herbal TisaneI like to make this herbal tisane when I feel like I might be coming down with a cold. Dried herbs are best for this blend as they are easy to source and store.

Combine the following:

1 tsp Red Clover Blossom – For immune support and nourishment. Red clover blossom is contains many essential vitamins and minerals that are easily absorbed by the body. Red clover blossom fortifies the body and adds an extra source of nutritional support when the appetite is low.

1 tsp Dandelion Leaf- For cleansing the body. Dandelion is a diuretic, so leave this out if feeling dehydrated or having kidney concerns.

1 tsp Mullein Leaf-For soothing the body. Mullein has anti-inflammatory properties and is especially good for calming irritated sinus and lung tissues.

1 tsp Peppermint Leaf-For clearing sinuses and calming. Peppermint helps the body to relax. Breath in the peppermint aroma while drinking the tea to gently sooth sinuses and relax the body.

Mix together well and use 1 tsp per cup (8 oz) of hot water. Allow the brew to sit covered for 10 minutes before drinking. Sip slowly. 3-4 cups can be enjoyed for immune support throughout the day.

Please note: I recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications. This information is for educational purposes only and has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

Today I am grateful for this incredible human I get to call my partner in life. 9 years. What a blessing. #mylove #myfavoritehuman #twitterpainted #heissocute #365grateful

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Flush

watercolor

Float Away

hot air balloon watercolor

Today I am grateful for the cows and people at Strauss Family Creamery who make pure eggnog perfection, what a treat

 

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Today I am grateful for the Giants of the North. #365grateful #redwoods #gratitude #smellofdampearth – from Instagram

Today I am grateful for the Giants of the North. #365grateful  #redwoods #gratitude #smellofdampearth - from Instagram

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About Rahanna

I am interested in many things. Farming, plant medicine, healing, yoga, cooking, deepening mind-body understanding and connection, spirituality, animal behavior, writing, visual arts, noodle soup, gummy foods, really good crusty bread….

I often feel like I am a bumble bee. Bouncing from one interesting topic to another, staying there until I get some really excellent bits of nectar and the moving to the next thing. I rarely stay put with one interest for any length of time. Perhaps it is fear of commitment, perhaps that is just my personality. It is a large part of me that I am just starting to see, understand, accept, and explore. I suppose all this writing is just an exercise in learning to be the authentic me. Rara Land (this website) is an exercise in finding my voice, which maybe can unify all these pieces. Come share this learning with me. Cause it is always better it seems, when we do this thing called life together.

Contact Me!

Koi in sunlit waters – from Instagram

Koi in sunlit waters - from Instagram

Absolutely gorgeous purple potatoes.#farmersmarket #purplepotatoes #colorissofun – from Instagram

Absolutely gorgeous purple potatoes.#farmersmarket #purplepotatoes #colorissofun - from Instagram

Dried calendula ready for storage and #infusion #plantmedicine #plantsarefriends – from Instagram

Dried calendula ready for storage and #infusion #plantmedicine #plantsarefriends - from Instagram

Tonight's #sleepytimetea blend experiment: lavender, chamomile and lemon verbena. #justbeautiful #plantmedicine #tisane #healingandrestoration – from Instagram

Tonight's #sleepytimetea blend experiment: lavender, chamomile and lemon verbena. #justbeautiful #plantmedicine #tisane #healingandrestoration - from Instagram

Kunekune piglets at the National #Heirloom Exposition. – from Instagram

Kunekune piglets at the National #Heirloom Exposition. - from Instagram

Make shift drying rack for our #homemademedicine in our tiny apartment…will work just fine until the rains come. #plantmedicine – from Instagram

Make shift drying rack for our #homemademedicine in our tiny apartment...will work just fine until the rains come. #plantmedicine - from Instagram

Tonight's #sleepytimetea experiment:rosemary blended with calendula and spearmint. #happydance – from Instagram

Tonight's #sleepytimetea experiment:rosemary blended with calendula and spearmint. #happydance - from Instagram

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